Job Interview Tips

 

Job interviews in many organizations are getting sophisticated these days. Psychological tests, role plays, and challenges to one’s “quick intelligence” and street smarts are often part of the package. While it’s impossible to anticipate everything you may encounter, here are ten tips that will help you negotiate the interview process successfully.

 

1.Prepare and over-prepare

It is assumed that you don’t go in with egg on your tie, spinach in your teeth, or without a thorough knowledge of the organization and position for which you are interviewing. Beyond that, there’s an important principle that will enable you to be much more confident. It’s called, “over-preparing.” It goes like this: Plan your strategy–your answers to all the possible questions you may be asked or the challenges that may be thrown at you–and then practice, practice, practice. Role play and repeat your best responses until they are entirely natural, until they simply roll off your tongue with the apparent spontaneity that comes only with successive repetition.

 

2.Be particularly clear on what you know and what you want to achieve

If your interview is resume-based (you’ve had to supply a resume either before or concurrently), have the facts of your stated objective, relevant experience, education, etc. thoroughly memorized and mentally supported. As to your job objective, be clear on what you want, as well as what you don’t want. There’s little room in the job market for the applicant who’s willing to take anything; he or she will usually get nothing!

 

3.Make sure your responses match your claims

If, for example, you’ve taken extra coursework to qualify for a particular position, license, or certification, tie it into your narrative, e.g., “When I took my coursework for my CPA, I learned that …” Build on your resume, but don’t refer directly to it (assuming the interviewer has it in his or her possession); make sure the connections are there, but do it subtly.

 

4.Be clear about your strengths

You’re almost certain to be hit with questions pertaining to your strengths and weaknesses. Know your strengths and emphasize those that relate specifically to the position for which you’re being considered. If, for example, you’re applying for a sales position, you might describe one of your strengths (if it’s true) as follows: “I’ve made a study of personality types and I’ve learned to quickly type people in terms of the kinds of approaches that might best attract them.” Be prepared, in this case, to back up your claim if the interviewer suddenly asks: “What type would you say I am?”

 

5.Describe your weaknesses as strengths

This is tricky, so let’s think about why the question is asked. The interviewer probably wants to learn several things about you with this question, such as: whether or not you are arrogant (“I really don’t think I have any weaknesses”), whether you know yourself (“Well, I’ve never really thought about that”), and finally, what you are doing to eliminate your weaknesses. Here are two ways to answer this question so that you leave a positive impression in the mind of the interviewer: (a) Show that, in overcoming a weakness, you’ve learned. If, for example, there’s a period in your chronology that just doesn’t fit (say that you took a job selling cars between jobs as an accountant … it happens!), you might tell the interviewer: “One weakness, which it took me some time to overcome, wasthat I really wasn’t sure that I wanted to be an accountant. For example, in 1988-90, I worked as a car salesman. I did so because I couldn’t decide if I wanted to make accounting my career. That experience taught me that I really didn’t want to sell products, and that I was much more challenged by the opportunity to solve client problems. (b) Pick a weakness that is really a strength. If, for example, you’re interviewing for a job in an organization you know is hard-charging and unforgiving of average performance, you might say, “One of my weaknesses is that I tend to be impatient with people who aren’t willing to pull their full weight and give 110%.” In this case, your “weakness” may help you get the job.

 

6.If you’ve been fired, be forthright about it

So many people have been laid off through no fault of their own in the past ten years that it’s no longer a stigma to have been fired–unless it was for justifiable cause (e.g.,- you socked your boss). Answer directly, but without a “charge” in your voice. Expressing your bitterness over being let go tells the interviewer (rightly or wrongly) that you can’t accept the realities of modern free enterprise — that downsizing is acceptable and often necessary.

 

7.Be clear where you want to go

A standard question which has all manner of variations is: “Where do you want to be five years from today?” Only today, the answers are different. Unless you plan to inherit Dad’s company, your answer is apt to be a lot more general than it might have been a decade ago. Why? Because the economy and nearly every industry are changing so fast that specificity with respect to the distant future is extremely difficult. So, instead of responding to the question with, “I plan to be in a position of senior leadership in this company,” you might want to say: “I plan to become qualified in every phase of this industry.” The exact response depends upon the specifics of your job hunting campaign, but the principle is: be specific while allowing yourself the flexibility which suggests that you understand the complexities of the business you’re applying for.

 

8.Have clear personal standards

This is a sleeper because, on the face of it, the question doesn’t seem to have much to do with the immediate interview. Today, however, many organizations are looking for people who DO have standards regarding their personal and professional lives, who can articulate them clearly and concisely, and who live by them. In this case, the briefer, the better. “I delegate my weaknesses.” “I don’t take on projects unless I can give them 100% dedication.” “I respond in specifics and avoid meaningless generalities.” “I am committed to life-long learning and growth.”

 

9.Interview the interviewer

The applicant who will take anything offered is unlikely to win any but the most temporary of positions. A competent interviewer (there are some) will respect your efforts to assess the organization and the position in terms of whether or not it meets YOUR requirements. And you owe it to yourself to have defined before hand, what you ideally want and what you are willing to settle for, under certain conditions. For example, you might really want a salary of $75,000 to begin with, but you’d be willing to take less if the opportunities for growth are clearly in the picture.

 

10.Don’t allow yourself to be badgered by the salary issue

Even today, it’s still not uncommon to hear the old refrain: “Our policy is not to pay a new employee more than X% higher than he/she is currently making.” Sorry, that doesn’t fly. The real issue, and the only one at stake here, is whether or not your prospective employer is willing to pay WHAT YOU ARE WORTH. And, your worth is a function of the job itself and your capability and willingness to perform it. In most organizations, there are clear parameters for a given job, a range of salary that is adjustable depending upon the market and the applicant’s experience. In most cases, unless you are very good, you will have to work within those limits. But, within the limits, what you are worth is a matter of mutual agreement based on your own knowledge of your worth and your ability to convince those interviewing you. So, to sum it up: Know the range of compensation for the job you’re seeking, make your own realistic determination of what you’re worth, and then be prepared to stand your ground.

The 10 Best Interview Questions to Ask

The best interview questions tell you about the person behind the resume, revealing the job candidate’s personality, strengths, weaknesses, knowledge, skills and abilities.

The best interview questions also benefit job seekers by giving them an opportunity to speak to details that don’t fit on a resume.

While a savvy interviewer always includes questions tailored to the position, our list of the 10 best questions works across a variety of industries and job descriptions:

  1.  From everything you’ve learned about this role, me and our company, tell me how you feel you’d make a contribution.

This interview question sorts people into two categories: contenders and also-rans.

“Those who have really prepared will love this opportunity to shine and stand out, demonstrating that they have done all the homework that can absolutely be done in today’s world of instant information,” says Darrell W. Gurney, career coach and author of Never Apply for a Job Again: Break the Rules, Cut the Line, Beat the Rest.

“Those who haven’t will stumble and try to put some generic response together, which will be obvious.”

  1. Why should we hire you?

This is among the best interview questions because it asks job candidates to define what sets them apart from the intense competition in today’s job market, says Doug Schade, principal & supervising executive recruiter, Winter, Wyman & Company — New York Accounting & Finance.

Faced with a big stack of resumes telling a similar story, this question helps you determine the best candidate.

An interviewee who does a great job explaining how her unique experience, education, industry credentials, and personal interests will power your business will do the same thing for your company once hired.

  1. If you could start your career over again, what would you do differently?

While no one likes to dwell on past regrets, this can be a good question to ask, says Brendan Courtney, president of staffing firms Randstad Finance & Accounting and The Mergis Group, Boston.

Asking a candidate to explain the major decisions he has made, highlighting the positive and negative, reveals the person’s ability to make calculated decisions based on past professional and personal experiences.

It also lets candidates share their vision for the future and their ambitions.

  1. When I contact your last supervisor and ask which area of your work needs the most improvement, what will I learn?

“I love this question because it’s the one that actually garners an honest response from the candidate,” says career coach Lauren Milligan of Resu Mayday, a Warrenville, Illinois, career-counseling firm.

“No amount of finesse will influence this answer because when the supervisor is brought into the conversation, the candidate knows the truth will come out anyway. Essentially, it’s the same question as ‘what is your biggest weakness,’ phrased in an unexpected way.”

  1. Describe the best boss you ever reported to.

This is a great interview question because it tells you about past relationships, says Kathy Downs, recruiting manager, Robert Half Finance & Accounting, Menlo Park, California.

“Because it highlights the personality and work types the applicant meshes with best, the interviewer can gain greater insights into the candidate’s communication skills, work style and potential cultural fit,” she says.

Follow up with questions about what made the relationship click — was it personality, performance, or perhaps a cheerleader type of boss? Does the candidate prefer autonomy to handholding, or was he inspired by a mutual drive to achieve organizational goals?

  1. Tell me about what motivates you. 

Ask these questions in sequence to better understand the interviewee’s motivations, explains Janette Marx, SVP with Adecco Staffing US, Melville, N.Y.

If what drives the interviewee matches the position and your corporate culture, you have a winner.

  1. What frustrates you?

When the candidate then talks about past frustrations, he reveals details about his personality, diplomacy skills and ability to work on teams.

Does the candidate answer by discussing minor irritations — or ways that he successfully resolved serious conflicts over time, budgets, or priorities? The latter are candidates who have positive intelligence.

  1. Tell me about the toughest negotiation you’ve ever been in.

Every job involves negotiation, and this question yields insight, not only in their direct negotiation skills, but also how the job seeker navigates difficult situations, Marx says.

The best negotiators answer this question by laying out both sides of the problem and then explaining how they aligned the issues or followed a process to a mutually-agreeable solution.

  1. How do you involve your staff when an important company strategy decision needed to be made? 

The candidate’s answer tells you whether a manager is secure enough to involve others in strategic decision-making, says Jayne Mattson, senior vice president, Keystone Associates, Boston, a career management firm.

How the job seeker involves his staff — via written communication, one-on-one or in a group setting — tells you a lot about their management style.

  1. Where do you see yourself in five years?

With this question, it’s not what the candidate says but how she says it that’s important, says Joey V. Price, CEO of Jumpstart HR, a managed HR services firm in Washington, D.C.

“If you see someone’s eyes light up at the thought of the future, then you can tell this is a very ambitious person who knows where they want to go and will do everything in their power to help ensure your organization gets them there.”